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Tymoshenko ran for president

Yulia Tymoshenko, one of Ukraine's most polarizing political figures, announced Thursday that she will run in the country's May 25 presidential election.

A former prime minister who was released from prison last month following the overthrow of her longtime rival nu skin, President Viktor Yanukovych, Tymoshenko said she was running to protect the unity of Ukraine.

Ukraine's presidential election is taking place against the backdrop of Russia's annexation of Crimea, Ukraine's dire economic straits and rumblings of discontent in the country's mainly Russian-speaking eastern provinces.

"I will be the candidate of Ukrainian unity," the 53-year-old Tymoshenko said. "The west and center of Ukraine has always voted for me, but I was born in the east, in Dnipropetrovsk."

This will be her second attempt to secure the presidency — she narrowly lost to Yanukovych in 2010.

Once Yanukovych was in power, Tymoshenko was brought to trial and convicted of abuse of office for negotiating a 2009 deal for Russian gas imports at an allegedly excessive price. The trial was widely seen as a political vendetta, but the gas deal and Russian President Vladimir Putin's comments that he found Tymoshenko easy to work with shadowed her image with many Ukrainians.

Tymoshenko struck a hostile stance toward Putin on Thursday, saying she considers him "the No. 1 enemy of Ukraine."

Her return to the forefront of public life brings back one of the most divisive figures in Ukraine's political scene. She is variously admired as an icon of democracy and detested as a self-promoting manipulator with a shady past.

Long before achieving political renown nu skin hk, Tymoshenko was already a high-profile figure in Ukraine. She and her husband took early advantage of former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev's perestroika reforms by creating a popular video rental business.

Ukraine's Tymoshenko to run for president: Yulia TymoshenkoAP Photo: Sergei Chuzavkov
Former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, center, prior her press conference in Kiev, Ukraine, Thursday, March 27, 2014.
The couple founded a fuel distribution company and she became head of Unified Energy Systems, a wholesale broker of natural gas. In that post, she became one of Ukraine's richest and most powerful oligarchs — and was dubbed "The Gas Princess."

With her blond braids and telegenic smile, Tymoshenko came to international prominence in the 2004 Orange Revolution, mass protests that culminated with the overturning of a widely criticized election that had given Yanukovych the presidency.

A re-run of the election handed the presidency to her political ally Viktor Yushchenko, under whom she served as prime minister. However, Yushchenko and Tymoshenko quarreled extensively, leaving the government near-paralyzed at times, and broad voter disappointment helped Yanukovych win the presidency in 2010.

Tymoshenko said Thursday she would not squander voters' trust this time around.

"I will do everything to ensure that our second European revolution does not lead to distrust, depression and disappointment," she said. "I will everyday work to earn the trust that is afforded to me by the people."

Tymoshenko is the best known of an array of potential new candidates in a race left wide open by Ukraine's political upheaval, ranging from former heavyweight boxer Vitali Klitschko to politicians who have their political base in the eastern provinces.

Yet a survey conducted in mid-March by the SOCIS polling organization found Tymoshenko getting only about 12 percent support among likely voters. The top figure, by a wide margin with 36 percent, g-suite manchester was chocolate magnate and former foreign minister Petro Poroshenko, whom many expect to declare his candidacy before registration concludes on Sunday.

"I am certain that if Poroshenko wins that I, as a person who wants the good of Ukraine, will protect the unity of democratic forces and will support all real reforms and the transformation of our country," Tymoshenko said.
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by seungdd | 2014-03-28 11:15 | g-suite in oldham

Congressman Maesa Harua

Howard "Bo" Callaway Sr., a former Georgia congressman, Army secretary and one of the founders of Callaway Gardens, died Saturday. He was 86.

Callaway died at an assisted-living facility in Columbus from complications from a brain hemorrhage he suffered about two years ago, nu skin said Rachel Crumbley, a Callaway Gardens spokeswoman.

Bo Callaway dies: Howard 'Bo' Callaway Sr.REUTERS: Callaway Gardens
Howard 'Bo' Callaway Sr.
His son Edward said in a statement that his family and the gardens family will miss him deeply.

"While he may be gone in body, as a founder of Callaway Gardens with my grandparents, his spirit will live on in his love of and vision for Callaway Gardens," Callaway's son said.

Callaway was elected to Congress in 1964, becoming the first Republican congressman from Georgia since Reconstruction. He left Congress to run for governor in 1966. Callaway actually received 3,000 more votes than the Democratic nominee, segregationist Lester Maddox, but because former Gov. Ellis Arnall mounted a write-in campaign, no candidate received the majority needed to win.

State law at the time did not allow for a general election runoff and instead, the Legislature was allowed to choose the next governor, nuskin hong kong and the Democratic-controlled body backed Maddox.

Although he lost, he inspired a generation of young Republicans, according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Georgia House Speaker David Ralston, R-Blue Ridge, was 12 in 1966 and told the newspaper he remembered even then the impact Callaway had.

"I grew up in a family of Republicans and Bo Callaway was what we had been waiting for," Ralston said. "I was in elementary school and I had my Blue Horse notebook and I had a 'Go Bo' sticker. And I remember being very proud."

In 1973, he was appointed Secretary of the Army. From 1970 until 2003, he was the principal owner and CEO of Crested Butte Mountain Resort in Colorado. In 1980, he unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. Senate in Colorado and he was chairman of the state Republican Party there from 1981 until 1987.

Callaway was born in LaGrange, Ga. He attended the Georgia Institute of Technology before leaving to become a cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point. He graduated in 1949 with a military engineering degree.

During his military career, Callaway served as a lieutenant. He was a platoon leader in Korea and a tactics instructor at Fort Benning. Callaway ended his military service in 1953 to return home and help his father develop and manage Callaway Gardens, a 6,500 acre garden and resort in Pine Mountain.

Callaway was a rabid baseball fan and his boat, the O Be Joyful, cardinal manchester was a favorite pastime and one that he relished sharing with his family.

In celebration of Callaway's life, a memorial organ concert will be held Wednesday at the Ida Cason Callaway Memorial Chapel at Callaway Gardens.
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by seungdd | 2014-03-17 12:18 | g-suite in oldham

Factors of cost increasing

A new survey of the nation's college freshmen has found that the percentage attending their first-choice school has reached its lowest level in almost four decades, as cost and the availability of financial aid have come to play an influential role in decisions of where to enroll g-suite cardinal manchester.

The annual survey released Wednesday, conducted by UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute, found that while more than three-quarters of those who started college last fall were admitted to the school they most wanted to attend, only 57 percent ended up going to their top school. That was the lowest rate in the 39 years that the institute has asked first-time freshmen if they enrolled at their dream college.

Kevin Eagan, the institute's interim managing director and an assistant professor at UCLA, said the cost of attending college appears to be largely responsible for the decline. A record 46 percent of students reported that cost was a very important factor in where they ended up, compared with 31 percent nine years ago. Meanwhile, the share of respondents who said being offered financial aid was a crucial factor in the decision to enroll at their current campus reached 49 percent — an all-time high.

"The difficult financial decisions that students and their families have to make about college are becoming more evidence," Eagan said. "Colleges that can reduce net costs to families are gaining an edge in attracting students."

Although many colleges are turning to online courses as a way to reduce costs and the time it takes to earn a degree, the survey showed that the idea was not very popular with students. Fewer than 7 percent indicated there was a very good chance they would take an online course offered by their college. The percentage was twice as high, however, among students at historically black colleges and universities.

Other key findings:

— A career in business remained the top post-college path among first-time freshmen, with 13 percent expressing interest in pursuing a career as an entrepreneur nu skin hk, accountant, executive, manager, consultant or administrative assistant or in the fields of human resources, sales and marketing, finance, real estate and sports management. Ten percent said they want to be doctors; 7 percent engineers; 5 percent classroom teachers; 4 percent actors, artists and musicians; and 3 percent lawyers or judges.

— More students think that peers who entered the United States illegally as children should have the right to a public education. This year, 41 percent agreed with the statement that such immigrants should be denied an education, a drop of 16 percentage points since 1996, when the institute first included the question in the survey in 1996.

— Freshmen students also showed strong support for gay men and lesbians who want to adopt children. More than 83 percent said they think gay people should have the right to adopt.

— While college campuses are often thought to be hotbeds of radical politics, only 3 percent of the survey respondents described their political leanings as far-left, and only 2 percent as far-right. More students, 46 percent, regarded their political beliefs as middle-of-the-road g-suite, while 28 percent saw themselves as liberal and 21 percent conservative.

The survey was based on the responses of 165,743 first-time, full-time students at 234 four-year colleges and universities. The responses were statistically weighted to reflect the broader population of such students — approximately 1.5 million at 1,583 four-year schools across the U.S.
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by seungdd | 2014-03-07 17:05 | g-suite in oldham